huguenots of spitalfields
huguenots of spitalfields
huguenots of spitalfields
huguenots of spitalfields
huguenots of spitalfields
huguenots of spitalfields

Friday 29th September - Tour of the Huguenot Museum and the French Hospital

If you have ever wondered what The French Hospital is come along for a tour of the Museum and Hospital on 29 September. These are regular tours as the Hospital is in fact residential almshouses primarily for people of Huguenot descent, and therefore closed to the public except on special occasions like Heritage Open Days. The French Hospital was established in 1718 in London to care for Huguenot refugees who needed support & is now on Rochester High Street. Several of the trustees of the Museum have links to the Hospital going back several generations and the core of the Museum’s collection comes from the collections of the French Hospital. You can hear these personal stories as well as find out about both organisations on these tours. Fri 29 September 2-4pm £12 including refreshments.

Saturday 30th September - Talk by Author Liz Trenow on her book The Silk Weaver

This autumn The Huguenot Museum launches a new venture, a historical novel book club. We will read historical novels that have a link to the history of the Huguenots and we are delighted to welcome the author of our first book, Liz Trenow to give a talk on Saturday 30th September about her novel ‘The Silk Weaver’. In her talk, For the Love of Silk, Liz will talk about how she came to write The Silk Weaver. The novel is based on the story of Anna Maria Garthwaite, one of the most important designers of patterned silks, an industry which centred on Spitalfields in the 18th century that was transformed by Huguenot craftspeople. Liz’s own family's unique silk weaving history also inspired this novel. Stephen Walters & Sons of Sudbury is the oldest silk weaving company in Britain, which has been continuously family-owned since its beginnings three hundred years ago.  The museum shop stocks copies of The Silk Weaver, so do buy a copy and read it before the talk, and Liz will be happy to sign them on the day.

The first meeting of the book club, when we will discuss the novel, will take place on Thursday 19 October 2pm. The first meeting will be free and refreshments will be provided. We will be a friendly, informal group and no prior knowledge of the Huguenots is necessary, just an enthusiasm for history and a good story!

 

Saturday 28th October - Talk on the significance of Huguenot refugees and their descendants in the Industrial Revolution

Amanda Thomas, from Friends of Medway Archives (FOMA) will give a talk on the significance of Huguenot refugees & their descendants in the Industrial Revolution. By the eighteenth century innovators like the papermaker Henry Fourdrinier and silk weaver George Courtauld were among many making their own unique contribution to British industry. Huguenot involvement in science, technology and engineering is perhaps less well known than the decorative arts, but just as important. Huguenots were involved in the design and manufacture of high quality consumer goods, including watches and clocks.  Without these Britain’s factories would not have operated so efficiently and the new steam-powered locomotives transporting goods to Britain’s ports and cities would not have run on time. Sat 28 October, 2-3.30 £10 including museum admission.

For more details on all the Huguenot Museum's programmes including booking information see their website www.huguenotmuseum.org

 

For more information please contact Dinah Winch This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 01634 789347




Friday 29th September - Tour of the Huguenot Museum and the French Hospital

If you have ever wondered what The French Hospital is come along for a tour of the Museum and Hospital on 29 September. These are regular tours as the Hospital is in fact residential almshouses primarily for people of Huguenot descent, and therefore closed to the public except on special occasions like Heritage Open Days. The French Hospital was established in 1718 in London to care for Huguenot refugees who needed support & is now on Rochester High Street. Several of the trustees of the Museum have links to the Hospital going back several generations and the core of the Museum’s collection comes from the collections of the French Hospital. You can hear these personal stories as well as find out about both organisations on these tours. Fri 29 September 2-4pm £12 including refreshments.

Saturday 30th September - Talk by Author Liz Trenow on her book The Silk Weaver

This autumn The Huguenot Museum launches a new venture, a historical novel book club. We will read historical novels that have a link to the history of the Huguenots and we are delighted to welcome the author of our first book, Liz Trenow to give a talk on Saturday 30th September about her novel ‘The Silk Weaver’. In her talk, For the Love of Silk, Liz will talk about how she came to write The Silk Weaver. The novel is based on the story of Anna Maria Garthwaite, one of the most important designers of patterned silks, an industry which centred on Spitalfields in the 18th century that was transformed by Huguenot craftspeople. Liz’s own family's unique silk weaving history also inspired this novel. Stephen Walters & Sons of Sudbury is the oldest silk weaving company in Britain, which has been continuously family-owned since its beginnings three hundred years ago.  The museum shop stocks copies of The Silk Weaver, so do buy a copy and read it before the talk, and Liz will be happy to sign them on the day.

The first meeting of the book club, when we will discuss the novel, will take place on Thursday 19 October 2pm. The first meeting will be free and refreshments will be provided. We will be a friendly, informal group and no prior knowledge of the Huguenots is necessary, just an enthusiasm for history and a good story!

Saturday 28th October - Talk on the significance of Huguenot refugees and their descendants in the Industrial Revolution

Amanda Thomas, from Friends of Medway Archives (FOMA) will give a talk on the significance of Huguenot refugees & their descendants in the Industrial Revolution. By the eighteenth century innovators like the papermaker Henry Fourdrinier and silk weaver George Courtauld were among many making their own unique contribution to British industry. Huguenot involvement in science, technology and engineering is perhaps less well known than the decorative arts, but just as important. Huguenots were involved in the design and manufacture of high quality consumer goods, including watches and clocks.  Without these Britain’s factories would not have operated so efficiently and the new steam-powered locomotives transporting goods to Britain’s ports and cities would not have run on time. Sat 28 October, 2-3.30 £10 including museum admission.

For more details on all the Huguenot Museum's programmes including booking information see their website www.huguenotmuseum.org

For more information please contact Dinah Winch This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 01634 789347

Huguenots walking tours in Spitalfields take place on the first Tuesday of each month from May to October. We meet at Christ Church, Spitalfields at 2pm. The second Huguenots of Spitalfields walking tour this year takes place on Tuesday 6th June.

Donation £10 per head goes towards the Huguenots of Spitalfields educational fund. You can turn up on the day but to make a booking please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For further details please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Many of the Huguenots (French Protestants) who left France after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 were weavers - over the years 25,000 settled in Spitalfields. They brought their skills (known as “the Mysteries of the Strangers”), new techniques,new ideas and the incomparable French style. The master weavers lived in large, elegant houses whilst the journeymen weavers lived in small houses north of Spitalfields and Bethnal Green. You will hear about the silk industry, famous pattern designers, fashions, the weaving process and much more. Notably we will pass Anna Maria Garthwaite’s house and the hear the compelling story of this remarkable woman who died over 250 years ago.

 huguenot logo

Ideas for Learning

Questions pupils answer by the end of the session:

  • Who were the Huguenots (what bound them as a people?)
  • What did they believe in?
  • Why did they leave France and where did they go?
  • Why did they come to Britain?
  • What was Britain and London like at that time?
  • What work did they do and how did people train / get employment?
  • Why were their houses designed as they were? Were they all the same?
  • How did they live (food, income, family, health, training and community)?
  • What was their legacy; fabrics and banking?

Schemes of Work and classroom activities

 

No. Theme Activities Links / Resources Curriculum
1 Family tree- Research a Huguenot family name.
  • Research- Find out more about this family by researching and reading about them
  • Make a family tree showing clearly how each person was related (group work). See how many family members can you find out about
  • Find out more about one member of the family and write about them- where they came from and settled, where they worked, what they wore. Also draw a picture of them.
  • Research what London was like at the time that this family came to Britain. Research information about how they lived, what they ate and what they wore.
  • A day in the life- Can you write a diary entry about how this person must have felt settling into a new place and how different it was for them. Show and tell your stories.
  • Share your work in an assembly, sharing with others what you have found out about the Huguenot family you researched.
  • THEMED HOMEWORK- Trace your ancestors and make a family tree to share with the rest of the class with help from your parents or carers.
Database of Huguenots/ watch an episode of BBC’s ‘Who do you think you are?’/ Research V&A Huguenot textile designs
Museum of London website
KS1 or Lower KS2 students:
English, PSHE, History, Art

Adapt sessions to suit

2 Working children
  • Research the lives and working conditions of the dyers, spinners, weavers and children who worked in the Silk Trade in Spitalfields. Describe their talents and also how they lived and worked in poverty and how it affected their health. Can you write a diary entry about a normal day as a child working in the Silk Trade.
  • The Homes of the Weavers
  • Read about and research the elegant Master Silk Weavers’ houses in Spitalfields.
  • Make a sketch of a room inside the elegant Silk Weaver’s house.
  • Weaving Class- Weave a small pattern that can be repeated to make up a mat.
  • Block Printing
  • Research the methods of block printing. Can you create your own simple design and block print it on fabric?
  • Poetry or poster- Write a poem on the plight of the Huguenots; weaving long hours, not knowing the language, earning little money and in a strange country. Or design a poster to make people aware of the plight of poor and young workers.
  • ADDITIONAL THEMED WORK- Look at Huguenot silk designs. Produce your own designs to colour and draw and use the block printing techniques to produce your own designs. Put on an exhibition of the whole classes designs.
Museum of London books and resources

KS2 students:
Literacy, PSHE, History, Art

Adapt sessions to suit

3  Politics / Global issues/ inequality
  • Fight for a living wage, then and now (here and in Bangladesh) and movement of trade between different countries i.e. China to Vietnam
  • Gap between consumers and producers (and middle men) – parallels to Huguenots and their customers
  • Study the transition of immigration and exodus in Spitalfields from the Huguenots to the present day- Protestants, Jews and Muslims. How has this transformed and changed the area?
  • Split into groups – each look at the buildings at a different period of time and display output alongside the other groups. Focus on legacy, architecture and impact. Develop / use a timeline of events and be able to click on “postcards” of events
  • Produce short films that provide coverage of the Huguenots landing in Dover in the style of a broadcaster describing the scene as a boat docks on the jetty. Describe the exhausted passengers, luggage, emotion and state of health.
Historical records and trade unions; modern day campaigns
BBC3 series taking teenagers to work in factories in Bangladesh
Fair trade material
Response to factory fire last year – pressure to increase minimum wage from industry
Texts, pictures, adaption of buildings and live/ work building and places of worship.
British Library
KS3/ 4:
Economics, D+T, business studies, PSHE, Geography

Adapt sessions to adapt

 4  Art / fashion
  • Research how has fashion changed over time and why; how this would affect a street scene (consider difference between dress of makers and customers).
  • Draw different costumes and explain rationale for differences.
  • What would you see today and why? Link between fashion and function.
  • Create a collage of fabrics from each period of time / community and arrange as one vast display in time order across a wall
  • Produce a series of sketches and drawing of a typical street scene during the time of the Huguenots and contrast this to today’s high street scene. Design this on your computer to show the contrast, colours and how the streets look.
  • Research weaving techniques and block printing techniques. Can you use these techniques to inform your new designs inspired by the Huguenot’s silk designs?
  • Produce new designs for fabric using the Huguenot designs as inspiration for high street wear or accessories.
V & A Museum
Research on the internet and books
KS3 and 4:
Art and can be used across D+T, textiles and product design

Can be for a whole term or a half-term

Credit: Tamsin Bradley

If you haven’t yet experienced the sound of the newly renovated superb Richard Bridges organ, built in 1735, at Christ Church Spitalfields, we have news of three concerts:

26th September, with international concert organist Margaret Phillips
24th October, with David Titterington, who is Head of Organist, Royal Academy of Music
28th November with Gerard Brooks, Curator Organist who will be launching the first double CD recording of this remarkable organ.  All concerts begin at 7.30pm and cost £10.  

The first organist who played Mr Bridge’s magnificent instrument was Huguenot Peter Prelleur, who led an extraordinary double life. He lived in Rose Lane and, as well as playing the organ at Christ Church and composing religious music, he often played in pubs including the Angel & Crown Tavern in Whitechapel. Prelleur’s major legacy is a guide for musicians entitled The Modern Musick-Master published in 1731 and described as “an introduction to singing, after so easy a method that persons of the meanest capacities may (in a short time) learn to sing (in tune) any song that is set to musick”. For three hundred years this was considered the most important singing manual.